The Do a Day Podcast

023: The Path of Prosperity Has Nothing to Do with Money with Emmitt Muckles

By on September 18, 2018


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Emmitt Muckles is an Author, Podcaster and speaker/ corporate trainer. Emmitt’s mission is to share the knowledge of conscious unlimited living. His current project is the Billionaire Lifestyle Podcast interviewing conscious creators helping audiences self mind coach and feel connected.

Even though Emmitt was successful vocationally, with the creation of The Billionaire Lifestyle LLC, and The Billionaire Lifestyle Podcast/blog Emmitt was seeking what he calls an intended purposeful life, as part of the pact derived from his departed mother Juanita Terry-Muckles teachings and guidance. It was this driving endeavor that fueled the creative process that led to  “The Journey of One”.” To Emmitt it is all about servitude, giving what I was given.”

Emmitt has been writing privately for the last 20 years and has decided to begin sharing his talents with the world through speaking, podcasting and writing to inspire and motivate the potential in every living person.

Key Points from the Interview with Emmitt Muckles

  • We are all literally connected, not only through DNA, but trough air – we are all on the same planet, doing similar things and all that we do impacts everyone else. We have more in common than we think, even if we have different lives.
  • It’s up to me to do something. I can’t wait for someone else to do what I want done.
  • The Billionaire Lifestyle, Emmitt’s show and company, has nothing to do with money. Rather than being a financial billionaire, it’s about having that level of life wealth, if you will. It’s about richness in terms of experiences, values and a sense of yourself. He shared how, between your elbow and the tip of your finger, there are over a billion cells, so you are made up of billions – billions of lives (since each cell is alive).
  • Emmitt’s goal is to free 100 million people from this path of pursuing what they don’t really care about in a mindless way.
  • When you have an epiphany in your life and you’re in a relationship with someone who hasn’t had a similar shift, that can create a rift as it can lead two people who were on a similar path to be on divergent paths.
  • When you focus on what you really want in your life, it may not as you imagine it or how you want it, but it comes, and you need to be ready for and open to it.
  • Are you living a life on purpose or on accident. Are you living a life around accomplishing what you care about? Are you accumulating experiences in your life.
  • When Emmitt removed the things he didn’t care about in his life, he realized he was still paying for them (literally), which was even more of a sign that having them in his life was holding him back.
  • Every night before he falls asleep, Emmitt gives thanks for what he has in life. He pauses to appreciate what he has instead of focusing on what he doesn’t have. It’s about giving gratitude.
  • We talked about whether you need to go through the tough stuff to be able to learn how to avoid them and values what you should have, or can you just appreciate the good stuff without experiencing the bad stuff. Emmitt pointed out how many of us are already living with the things we don’t want or need, so the question may be irrelevant.
  • Are you carrying bonus baggage unnecessarily? Are you carrying things that aren’t yours? Do you have things weighing you down that are keeping you from living a free, abundant life?
  • Emmitt talked about a friend who came from a very strong community of family – something we have gotten away from. It’s about giving up self in support of the community, which many of us don’t naturally do.
  • Our spiritual and emotional progress does not equal or has not advanced as fast as our technological progress.
  • We cut ourselves off from all that the human dynamic has when we separate ourselves from each other.
  • The mind, the body and the spirit are all needed to achieve the billionaire lifestyle Emmitt talks about.
  • Emmitt reminds us not to worry about the path because it will be revealed to you as long as you continue in the direction of what you want.
  • When you plant a seed for something, don’t expect to get the fruit where you plant the seed. When you plant an apple seed in the ground, don’t look at the ground for the fruit because it will come from above you. So when you put work into something, the payback for that effort may come from a totally unexpected place.
  • There’s nothing new under the sun. Whatever you are looking for, someone has found it before, so look around, read, and you can find the path.
  • When we pray, that’s us talking our god. When we meditate, that’s our god’s chance to talk to us.
  • Have things that have value that you have given it rather than value that the world gives it. So many times, we are told to value things, but that doesn’t mean they have real value to us. We should question what value this inanimate thing gives to us.
  • Everything has its art. When you see someone who does something really well, they’re in their flow because they’re in the art of it. Other people see it as an action, and think they can do that thing, but they don’t necessarily come to understand the art.
  • Everything has a moment of action and a moment of rest. You’re never in one state perpetually.

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022: Why Having a Fit Mind Matters for Your Wellbeing with Lee Havern

By on September 10, 2018


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Lee HavernLee Havern had many years of mentoring clients successfully in the Health and Fitness Industry. Then the sudden loss of his father sparked a downward spiral into a depression that lasted over four years. One night, a scare behind the wheel when his car lost control snapped him out of the spiral just as he had hit rock bottom. That was the push he needed to see a better way to live.

He Co-Founded Platinum Training Institute, A Health and Fitness Education Provider in Queen’s University Belfast focused on helping those with real health battles like Cancer, cardiac problems and mental illness, find empowerment and support through their own fitness. He then decided to follow his passion helping others to discover Happiness through Mental Health and Well Being. This is where Fit Mind Matters was born.

Lee Havern shares his journey and his message, along with how he personally lives his life with balance and presence to stay out of the spiral and live the fullest, most satisfying life possible.

Key Points from the Episode with Lee Havern

  • Lee Havern is focused on helping people with health issues that are often overlooked by the fitness community with their physical conditioning as part of their journeys
  • This comes from Lee’s first hand experience struggling with depression and thoughts of ending it all in the wake of losing his father to Cancer
  • Decluttering and removing distractions from our lives is one of the main things Lee has personally focused on for himself to help free him to work on what actually matters to him
  • Through the process after his losing his father, Lee grew in many ways, some some specific changes
  • While he used to be a pleaser and a yes man, he learned that saying yes to everybody is actually saying yes to nobody
  • He became a father and got divorced.
  • He learned a lot about taking responsibility and apologizing to piece his life, his family and his friendships back together
  • Loss can force the forgiveness and healing we need.
  • Sometimes, it takes hitting rock bottom to realize you can’t go any lower. We may need to see the bad to appreciate the good.
  • Having a group that supports you while you go through that rebuilding journey can be crucial.
  • The focus on aesthetics wasn’t resonating with him in his work as a personal trainer and coach, which is what lead him to focusing on people with serious health (mental and physical) issues, which is why he founded Platinum Training Institute as a way to train others on how to train those most in need of physical fitness for the tough journeys they’re on.
  • Lee Havern shut off all of his social media to get even further away from the aesthetic focus on these platforms, and because of how they can pull your attention from what’s right in front of you, so of course he had to close all of his accounts given what he feels is most important in life.
  • Slow it down a bit. Switch everything off, take a deep breath, and close your eyes. That’s meditation at its essence, so allow yourself to do it by turning off the distractions.
  • Lee doesn’t even see a need for the health and fitness industry. If we all prioritized getting out and being in the world, there wouldn’t be a need for it.
  • The major issues people are dealing with that Platinum Training focuses on are all related to mental health. If someone has Cancer, cardiac issues, etc, of course they have mental health issues as a result. It all relates back to helping people with their mind and how they feel about themselves. So that’s what he focuses on in his practice.
  • When we go into a job to make money, that’s the wrong job.
  • Don’t let some outside statement define you or what you do. Learn yourself, do the testing on yourself and see what works for you.
  • Lee and I discussed weighing yourself, and the pros and cons of it. What he has learned is that if he feels overweight, there’s something going on mentally that the weight (or the feeling of being overweight) is a signal of. It’s a signal that, in some way, he’s not looking after himself the way he should.
  • Lee leaves us with three central things to focus on: health, happiness and simplicity.

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021: Redesigning Wellness by Knowing Yourself with Jen Arnold

By on September 4, 2018


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Jen ArnoldJen Arnold is host of the Redesigning Wellness podcast where she interviews experts on the topic of organizational health. Jen’s on a mission to change the common approach to employee health and wellness. To support this mission, she facilitates employee training that addresses leadership, resilience and mindfulness.

For the 16 years prior to starting her own business, Jen led organizational health and wellness efforts and advised employers how to start them. Most recently, she worked at Blue Cross Blue Shield of NC for over 8 years leading a team of health promotion professionals.

Jen Arnold is a TEDx speaker who uses stories, activities and humor to not only make a point but to keep audiences engaged and listening. She lives in Raleigh, NC with her husband, two children and dog.

Key Points from the Episode with Jen Arnold

  • Jen Arnold’s story in childhood following her parents’ divorce when she was six, and she grew up with a mother who battled binge eating habits. Sometimes that meant eating a lot of healthy things, having a lot of unhealthy things around, or sometimes having no food around because it was all eaten or because the means weren’t there for there to be enough food. This has lead to a sense of food scarcity, so even today she looks to savor and save her food because of the wiring that tells her that it could all be gone in the next moment.
  • She described her mother’s situation as “eating her pain,” which is a phrase that really struck home for me as someone who has battled with emotional eating in my past.
  • Jen grew up extremely aware of her body and what she ate, and found herself embarrassed by her weight and body composition since she had a more muscular build than other girls, so she naturally weighed more and was bigger, even though she wasn’t overweight for her structure. She shared a particular story from her childhood, growing up own the deep, hot South where she would wear jeans every day to hide her calves, which were bigger and more muscular than other girls’ because she didn’t want people to notice them.
  • Sometimes, we are the meanest to the people we are closest to, and we may not put the work and introspection in to have empathy and compassion for those closest to us. That includes not just our immediate family, but even ourselves. Instead of judging the person, recognize the ‘stuff’ behind the actions or behavior. That helps you realize that there is a reason for the behavior, it’s not often in the person’s conscious control or awareness, and it comes from hurt rather than intentional dysfunction.
  • Jen went through high school as a the achiever, good student, type A. And at 18, she was very directed, but under that outside facade, she didn’t really know what she really wanted in her life.
  • After a car accident at 19, Jen Arnold decided she needed a shift, so she changed colleges and her educational focus to nutrition and took a lot of psychology courses to add the understanding of people’s mindset. That’s how she started down the wellness path, landing a role in a corporate wellness position at a hospital to help employees deal with their weight.
  • While she tried to help as much as she could in her early roles, she found herself with ineffective tools from the standard toolkit around calorie restriction, increased movement and short-term goals around things like corporate weight loss challenges.
  • She started her show, Redesigning Wellness, and started to find out more about mindfulness and its connection to effectively eating better through a guest she interviewed. While that was empowering to discover, it also showed her plainly that she was doing it wrong so far, which was a hard thing to deal with, bringing guilt and a sense of perhaps failing people.
  • She dove further into mindful eating education herself, and started to use that theme in her discussions with corporate clients and individuals she was trying to help.
  • The focus needs to shift from being about the weight and being about the person. It’s less about the surface level things, and more about the underlying reasons and values.
  • We focus on weight so often, and weight isn’t the question. We judge people who lost weight as doing something positive and looking good, but miss why they lost weight and whether they should. Jen shared the story from when she was in a pattern of getting sick over and over and a nurse at the doctor’s office was all excited and celebrating that she had lost weight without realizing it was because she was unwell.
  • We talked about exercise as a penance for what you eat. It’s a punishment, or a must-do. It’s to undo the choices you made around what you ate or will eat. That just reinforces the emotional connection to food, and strengthens the wrong kinds of thoughts around food. Jen talked about joyful movement instead. Let it feel good to move your body in and of itself, without connecting it to undoing some other ‘bad’ in your life.
  • Mindfulness, in essence, is the power of the pause. Stopping and checking in with yourself to break the cycle of mindless actions.

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020: Dedication to Finding Purpose Transforms Lives with Dr. Jason Brooks

By on August 28, 2018


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Recognized as one of the most prominent emerging voices in personal and organizational transformation, Dr. Jason is also likely to be one of the most authentic, transparent and “real”. His life mission of changing lives and growing leaders provides the foundation and focus where his purpose and passion are fully unleashed.

Dr. Jason has almost 25 years’ experience in senior leadership roles in multi-million and multi-billion dollar Fortune 100 and Fortune 500 organizations in multiple industries (including Cracker Barrel Old Country Store, Accenture, Gap, Inc., Hunt Brothers Pizza, Addiction Campuses, SmithKlein Beecham, Gaylord Entertainment Company, Emerson Electric Company, and American Addiction Centers). He is an expert in leading personal and organizational transformation of all kinds. He is founder and CEO of The Catalyst Leadership Group, a leadership solutions firm focused on growing leaders from the “inside-out” and helping them to unleash their full potential to deliver high-impact results through their work and leave a legacy of success and significance in life.

As a bestselling author, speaker, entrepreneur and executive, leadership consultant, executive coach and co-host of the Step into Leadership Podcast, he brings a heart for helping leaders of all kinds achieve their greatest potential, one step at a time.

Dr. Jason has earned the degrees of Doctor of Philosophy in psychology, Master of Business Administration, MS in mental health counseling, and BS in management. He is a Certified Executive Coach, Board Certified Coach with specialty designations as Executive/Leadership/Corporate/Business/Career Coach, Senior Professional in Human Resources and National Certified Counselor.

Dr. Jason lives just north of Nashville, Tennessee with his bride, Darla and three wonderful children, two sons and a daughter.

Key Points from the Episode

  • Dr. Jason Brooks is focused on two major themes in his life – he changes lives and grows leaders. He sees that as his calling, and how he’s placed every day is how he delivers on that.
  • He is the Chief People Officer for Addiction Campuses, which has facilities across the country to help people overcome addictions, and he’s charged with developing leadership of the organization so they can be a crucial part of transforming the lives of those seeking help.
  • He also has several consulting practices focusing on leadership development for people across all different kinds of backgrounds, which is where he and I met through the podcast he does within that work.
  • When you are operating at the center of your passion and really making a difference in the world in alignment with your values and the center of your passion, it doesn’t feel like work no matter how hard you are working.
  • So many people go into their day with a sense of drudgery on their faces. That what he tries to help people break through and ignite opportunity and find their passion. That’s how we maximize potential in ourselves.
  • When we’ve been in a rut for a long time, we get to a place where we often feel comfortable where we are and don’t spend the energy on breaking out. We are resigned to continue on. He shared a quote he once heard about ruts, “A rut is nothing more than a grave with no end.”
  • He was the first born in his family, and that set the stage for a responsibility and burden as the first born to achieving and the pressure of taking care of the family and living up to parental standards. As he achieved, the judgment always came that he was expected to achieve, so rather than celebrating what he reached, it was almost not valued. When he shared his interests (namely, in music), he was dissuaded from pursuing it because it wasn’t good enough, and needed to go back to something more grounded economically (e.g. accounting).
  • Through pursuing the path he was “supposed to” he kept feeling an emptiness and boredom. He would get into a new job, do well and improve things, and then get bored and leave for the next job.
  • The question was whether he was never satisfied (and couldn’t be), or whether he wasn’t able to use the creativity he was so longing to use. It turned out to be the latter, and that’s the path he pursued as his career progressed by taking the initiative to go on the journey and face the challenges to grow.
  • He realized he wanted to more than just “the right thing” and do something that would impact people’s lives, and went on to get a masters, an MBA and a doctorate over the course of seven years while also working full time.
  • Through a very intense process in which he pushed himself so hard, he finally found the value in himself and not simply because of the sense of obligation to someone else (such as his father). So now, he performs not because of obligation to the outside world, but because of a sense of his own capability and self-worth.
  • When you position yourself to let that inner part of who you are come out, that’s where the fullness of who you are and the impact you can make really gets to shine.
  • He shares the five values of a high impact leader: 1. Character, 2. Growth, 3. Relationships, 4. Results and 5. Vision.
  • Leadership is not just organizational leadership, it’s about leading your life. It’s about influence for yourself and for those around you. This mirrors the discussion Aaron Keith Hawkins and I had in episode 15 of the show.
  • Through our struggles, we learn and grow, and become better able to help others. Dr. Brooks shared some of his struggles, such as having to borrow money from his parents as a 40-something adjust to pay his mortgage and save his home, which taught him a lot about humility and stability, which he brings to his work today. It was also a break in the standard he’s had to live up to as the first born who never fails.
  • We can fall into the trap of comparison, which is the first step toward jealousy, then pride and then arrogance, which can all unravel us and be anchors in our lives that can hold us back from living a life as we truly can every day.
  • In looking back at some of his biggest professional struggles or failures, he realizes it wasn’t about what he was going to do, but rather points to focus on who you are going to be. It’s not in the ‘what’, it’s in the ‘who’.
  • You never learn as much as when you teach. When you find the growth in yourself, help other people on their path, and you will find yourself growing and learning in ways you wouldn’t have before, and often may find yourself growing more through teaching than when learning and perhaps more than the person you’re helping may get.
  • When you stretch yourself and stumble and fall, you have two choices. It can either be a prison or it can be a school. You can feel trapped and can’t break through, or you can learn from it, grow and move ahead. Seeing it as a school and not a prison is your choice, so don’t choose to make failure final.

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019: Finding Humility & Balance in the Unexpected with Tim Fargo

By on August 21, 2018


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Tim Fargo is a two-time Inc. 500 winner. After declaring bankruptcy in 1991, he took that moment of struggle and decided it wasn’t how he would be defined. He pushed himself forward, launched a new company, and sold it seven years later for $20m. He then wrote his book, Alphabet Success, and built the basis for his current company while promoting his book.

Today that company, Social Jukebox has thousands of customers around the world using it to post to their social media accounts.

There’s nothing quite like going from thinking you’re hot stuff to donating blood for cash to wake up your humility.

Key Points from the Show

  • Tim currently runs Social Jukebox, a business that came to be by accident when he was trying to achieve something else. While the “something else” wasn’t developing the way he had hoped, Social Jukebox became its own thing, and he recognized the need to shift his focus from what he had intended to what he was having success with.
  • Success wasn’t always part of Tim’s equation. Years before, he lost everything personally and professionally when his event marketing company went bankrupt along with him personally. This stemmed from Tim getting caught up in his own success, amassing debt that ultimately brought him down. And taught him a huge lesson about not believing your own hype and knowing what signs to look for that can help you check yourself.
  • When we fail, the worst thing you can do is let that failure have a lasting meaning in your life. While you can and should learn from it, you don’t have to let failure be your story or definition from yourself. Tim proved this first hand as he went on to start another company (after a journey and process of growth) that he eventually sold for millions of dollars.
  • We talked about Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson. He’s obviously been wildly successful as an actor, but that was not his path. He was on a trajectory to be an NFL star until an injury took him out of football in college. If he had taken that ending of his goal as a defining failure, he would never have pushed himself so hard down the path that he’s been on now. He realized his tenacity, dedication and drive were his skills, not just the physical capabilities needed in professional football, and he used those values to propel him down a different path.
  • Every time Tim has let his mind get “infected” with the idea that he’s somehow special or better-than such that his way (and only his way) will prevail, it’s been fraught with disaster. That is the essence of what lead to his bankruptcy. Instead, it’s about having the humility to recognize that you were wrong, but then find the lesson you can take forward.
  • Tim leaves us with some advice about balance when it comes to ourselves – we’re never quite a dumb as we think we are, nor are we quite as smart as we think we are. We’re somewhere in between.

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018: Why Vulnerability & Honesty are Key to Having Power with Sonya Looney

By on August 14, 2018


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It’s perseverance and attitude that propelled Sonya Looney to 25+ mountain bike endurance wins across the world including stage races in more than 20 countries. As a veteran stage racer and former 24-Hour World Champion, Sonya continues to endure all flavors of adventure and challenge in places like the Sahara Desert, Himalayas, jungles of Sri Lanka, South American Andes, and rural mountains of Haiti.  Her mantra “Be Brave. Do Epic Sh!t” prevails across all of her endeavors from motivational speaking, writing for multiple publications, to designing fun lifestyle products for her company, Moxy & Grit.

Sonya is the host of the popular podcast, The Sonya Looney Show where she speaks with experts across the categories of mindset, inspiring stories, and plant-based nutrition to give listeners the tools to live a purposeful and fulfilling life.

Key Ideas in the Episode

  • As an engineer at a solar energy company, Sonya Looney was pursuing a very different path from the one she ended up on, until trying mountain biking and getting totally hooked. While she had always been athletic, and had pushed herself in many areas of her life, mountain biking spoke to her in a way nothing had before, and has opened up the door to some amazing experiences taking in the world, its people and all the beauty it all has to offer.
  • During her time as an engineer, she had this desire to travel the world and ride her bike, but didn’t see how that could ever happen. Her journey is how it happened as that is exactly what she does in her life today as a professional mountain biker who has raced in over 25 countries around the world including Nepal, Sri Lanka, Costa Rica, Morocco, Haiti and many others.
  • What started as a very physical relationship with her competitive sport evolved into a more entrepreneurial lifestyle focused on how she can tell stories to people about how to live a better life that was inspired by her experiences all over the world.
  • How do we set expectations that push us ahead and yet don’t set us up for disappointment. There’s a line between being too easy to meet, being apathetic and being totally unrealistic. Ultimately, it’s really about what we do when we do or don’t meet those expectations and how we treat ourselves or others as a result (depending who did or didn’t meet those expectations).
  • When things go wrong, we have a choice of what we look at and conclude. If we focus on all the things that go wrong, we lose out on seeing any of what went right, and can end up defining ourselves through that failure.
  • Resilience is a muscle, and the only way to grow a muscle is to test and strain it through exercising it. Don’t shy away from the risk of failure, and don’t quit if you fail. Learn and grow from it to move forward.
  • When someone else is going through this, be mindful of what their needs are to get through it. Often people need validation of what they’re feeling, and that is ok. You don’t have to argue against or dismiss what they’re feeling. The same is true for you. The feelings around failure are valid. And you can move through them after processing them.

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017: The Power of Consistency in Finding What You Seek with Dorie Clark

By on August 7, 2018


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Dorie Clark is a marketing strategy consultant, professional speaker, and frequent contributor to the Harvard Business Review. Recognized as a “branding expert” by the Associated Press, Fortune, and Inc. magazine, she is the author of Entrepreneurial You (Harvard Business Review Press,), Reinventing You, and Stand Out, which was named the #1 Leadership Book of 2015 by Inc. magazine and one of the Top 10 Business Books of the Year by Forbes. It was also a Washington Post bestseller. Her books have been translated into Russian, Chinese, Arabic, French, Polish, Korean, and Thai.

Clark, whom the New York Times described as an “expert at self-reinvention and helping others make changes in their lives,” consults and speaks for a diverse range of clients, including Google, the World Bank, Microsoft, Morgan Stanley, the Ford Foundation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and Yale University.

A former presidential campaign spokeswoman, Clark is an adjunct professor of business administration at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business and a Visiting Professor for IE Business School in Madrid, Spain. She has guest lectured at universities including Harvard Business School, the Harvard Kennedy School, Stanford University’s Graduate School of Business, the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School of Business, the University of California-Berkeley’s Haas School of Business, Georgetown, NYU, the MIT Sloan School of Management, and the University of Michigan.

Her work has been published in the Harvard Business Review Guide to Getting the Right Job and the Harvard Business Review Guide to Networking, and she is quoted frequently in the worldwide media, including NPR, the BBC, and MSNBC. She is also a regular commentator on Canada’s CTV and was named one of Inc. magazine’s “100 Great Leadership Speakers for Your Next Conference.”

A former New England Press Association award-winning journalist, Clark directed the environmental documentary film The Work of 1000, and was a producer for a multiple-Grammy-winning jazz album. 

At age 14, Clark entered Mary Baldwin College’s Program for the Exceptionally Gifted. At 18, she graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Smith College, and two years later received a Master of Theological Studies from Harvard Divinity School. You can download her Entrepreneurial You self-assessment at dorieclark.com/entrepreneur.

Key Ideas in the Episode

  • Dorie grew up in North Carolina, where she went through school at a very accelerated pace, graduating from college very young, and taking that as an opportunity to escape a world where she didn’t feel she quite fit in.
  • She struggled to find a single path of success, and quickly learned a core lesson of her work today around perseverance and consistency. This becomes a theme for so much of her coaching and writing work, and the basis of a lot of what we discussed in the show.
  • Serving people in a true way–by being in touch with and working from your true values, interests and expertise–is the path to your greatest success.
  • To find success, you have to apply yourself with apply yourself, be consistent and persistent. That’s how you will get results. She learned that first hand, after taking two to three years and writing several hundred articles for top publications before she got activity and outreach as a result of all of that effort. While that may sound daunting, the results make it worth it, while also create a huge moat around you in terms of the effort someone else would have to put in to replicate your success.
  • The qualities that may make you a success at one time or in one situation in your life may actually work against you in another, so it’s important to think about your fit and why you will be success in each new situation we enter into.
  • When trying to get your message out, Dorie shared questions to get you thinking about what you need to do. What is it that makes me qualified to deliver the message I want to deliver? How can I demonstrate or show that? How can you do the things that come out of these questions?
  • She shared a self-assessment exercise, which is linked below, to help get you started on the journey of

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016: Self-Confidence & Curiosity Are Musts to Find Your Awesome with Kelsey Abbott

By on July 31, 2018


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Kelsey Abbott is a Confidence Coach & Instigator of Joy, writer, speaker and host of the Find Your Awesome podcast. She helps driven people crush self doubt so they can experience unstoppable growth with ease and freedom. To do that, she helps her clients learn to really truly love themselves, shed the shoulds, embrace their unique greatness and sparkle.

Kelsey studied at the Institute for Professional Excellence in Coaching (IPEC) where she earned certifications as a Certified Professional Coach, Energy Leadership Master Practitioner and Cor.E Performance coach. She also studied at the Applied Nueroscience Institute, earning her NeuroPositive Certificate in using neuroscience to change how the brain processes challenges.

Before becoming a Confidence Coach, Kelsey was a nationally-recognized science writer and marine biologist, working in DC, Seattle, Hawaii and Barbados, training dolphins and studying killer whales in the process. A competitive swimmer for most of her life, Kelsey transitioned to triathlons where she now competes at the national and international level.

Key Ideas in the Episode

  • Kelsey was an athlete, but stumbled into triathlon after a classmate in grad school asked her to do one, and she was hooked.
  • Despite her physical capability, Kelsey struggled with self-image and confidence, like so many of us. That uniquely positioned her to focus on confidence in her coaching work later in life.
  • While others might look at her and see physical capabilities, she remembers her view of herself as different and feeling like everyone else knows what they are doing and she doesn’t. Between her height (she’s nearly six feet tall), had some learning disabilities early on and was shy. Kelsey’s story is a great reminder of the importance of not judging a book by its cover. We never know what story is going on inside.
  • Through personal training and triathlon coaching, she realized people needed more than just the training, but needed boundaries and help with self-love to realize what they were capable of.
  • While she worked with teenager girls, she found that adults actually had a tougher time here, especially being able to make space for themselves and their needs. The way she puts it, the adults she worked with weren’t honoring themselves.
  • We talked about our inner critic, and Kelsey reminded us that we all have it, it can be valuable and it can be dangerous. We need to be mindful of it and learn how to control it. Take the value from the warnings and challenges it can give us without letting it become overly negative and the definition of our true selves.
  • When we think someone is making us feel bad, that is a signal that we should check ourselves and whether this even has anything to do with you. Are you taking something personally that has nothing to do with you? Even if their words have something to do with you, might it be a result of something going on with them? She shared a quote she had on her wall, “What I say is about me. What you hear is about you.”
  • She reminded us that when we face and get through a tough time, it’s a come back not a go back. We don’t have to go back to where we were with all the limitations we faced, but rather take the growth from it and seize the opportunity for growth in a new direction.

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015: The Power of Influence for Unbreakable Success with Aaron Keith Hawkins

By on July 24, 2018


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Aaron Keith Hawkins is the author of Million Dollar Influence, a keynote speaker, business and life coach, podcast host, and influence expert.

After a brush with his mortality in 2009 that we talk about in this interview, he dedicated his life to helping others increase their awareness of the thoughts and actions that are creating their experiences and results at home and work, and sharing simple but powerful skills to improve them.

Aaron’s podcast, Unbreakable Success, is full of training and interviews with some of today’s most influential thought leaders to help you achieve a lifestyle of success.

Key Points from the Show

  • By day, Aaron is a police captain after a long career in law enforcement, and the rest of the time, he’s a father, husband and coach focused on helping people achieve more success in their life with a focus on the influence we have on others and ourselves (most importantly).
  • He had a health scare in the middle of the night, thinking he was having a heart attack but actually was feeling the impact of a stroke, despite being younger and healthier than what you would expect for either to take place.
  • In the midst of that extreme event, he was overcome with a feeling of extreme regret, and felt himself vow to be different. Actually, he says it wasn’t a promise to be different, it was a sense that he was now different. His regret was not about what he didn’t do or have, but rather what he didn’t give of himself. He felt he was coasting, and it was impacting those he cared about and impacting himself.
  • How was going to live his life was different. He had been going about things in a ‘good enough’ way where he was thankful for what he had, but not looking to push harder for fear of the risks involved. He had more in life than he feels he was destined to have, so he was playing it safe despite all the potential he had within him. So he decided to live differently. This was the start of his transformation.
  • This triggered a desire to learn and grow, which lead him to completing his bachelor’s degree and getting deep in the self-help and growth space to make himself a better man.
  • As he got deeper into it, it was clear that he was meant to help others with exactly what he had done for himself, getting into your own values to be able to influence yourself to be better. As he says, he started to do things that scared the crap out of him before. Whatever scared him became a goal.
  • Through his years of helping people, the theme that became clearest was influence, which lead to his book, Million Dollar Influence. It’s not about influence to earn a lot of money. It’s about having real influence over yourself as the starting point, and how much that can unlock in terms of your potential in life, which can lead to achieving truly great things–including influencing others to support you in your quests.
  • Many people stop as soon as they stagnate or hit a roadblock. Take those moments as an invitation to learn more and build your skills so these things don’t stop you.

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014: Taking Responsibility for Your Life to Become a Human 2.0 with Mark Metry

By on July 19, 2018


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Mark is the host of iTunes Top Charts podcast, Humans 2.0. Mark’s show features an innovative and talented guest in every episode available on YouTube, iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher Radio, and iHeart Radio. On the show, Mark converses with CEO’s, entrepreneur’s, authors, and many other inspiring individuals like Jay Samit, Neil Patel, and David Meltzer to educate others to change their own lives and upgrade to the Human version 2.0 that is inside all of us.

Prior to creating the Humans 2.0 Podcast, Mark was the founder and creative director of PPMC, started in 2013, the #1 Pixelmon Minecraft server in the world. As creative director, Mark grew the company’s website to reach over 10 million users and 10,000 registered premium members. Mark managed a remote staff team of over 40 talented individuals and directed company growth programs.

Founded and operating VU Dream currently (started in Dec. 2016), a growing and innovative virtual and augmented reality marketing & advertising agency based in Boston. VU Dream has worked with dozens of startups, studios, arcades, and other VR/AR businesses to help customers imagine new future realities. VU Dream is responsible for advertising and marketing for many prominent virtual reality companies in the industry in many major cities around the world as well as posting daily content to millions of people online.

Key Points from the Show

  • Mark has done a lot, and yet he’s just cresting into adulthood – he started a very successful business while a teen, started a marketing company while still in college, and has started a podcast dedicated to helping people evolve who they are to align our internal minds with our external conflicts that has been resonating with listeners in a big way.
  • Mark shares what he calls a very personal, solitary hell that he was in as he was trapped in depression, anxiety and, what I came to see from hearing his story, apathy.
  • Mark and his family moved several times as a kid, which changed his childhood from one of being very engaged to being more withdrawn, which was amplified as he went from being one of many people of different backgrounds to being one of only three non-White kids in the school.
  • In a quest to improve his diet, he discovered Bulletproof Coffee, which did two things – established a morning routine, which helped break his cycle of apathy, and introduced him to the idea that what you put in your body can impact your mind. This started him down a path to pushing himself.

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