024: Coming Through Great Pain to Find Heart in Life with Terri Levine

By on September 25, 2018


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Terri Levine is known as the business-mentoring expert with heart and is a top business and marketing strategist.  She is changing the way business owners around the world connect with their target audiences, then sell and serve their customers and their employees. Terri is known for consulting with business owners to stop selling, marketing and operating businesses using traditional methods and moves them into true, authentic, heart-to-heart people-centered communication models where sales and marketing are done with authentic and transparency.

Dr. Levine has more than 30 years of business, sales, and marketing experience, encompassing work with over 5,000 business owners. She is also a best-selling author of over 30 titles and very popular keynote speaker.

Terri’s latest book, Turbocharge: How To Transform Your Business As A Heartrepreneur, hit the Amazon bestseller list 24 hours after release. Terri has a mission of changing the way business is done in the 21st century and creating a movement of hundreds of thousands of Heartrepreneurs doing business heart-to-heart.

Key Points from the Episode with Dr. Terri Levine:

  • Terri Levin had a picture perfect life. Then one day, she got injured which triggered a condition called Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy, or RSD. It is known as the most painful disease on the planet.
  • The pain wasn’t responding to the various and increasingly-powerful medications Terri tried, and ultimately she made a decision to end her life.
  • While sitting in her bed, writing a goodbye note to her husband, she found that she just kept writing, and had in fact written a book filled with a sense of purpose, thankfulness and direction that helped her realize what she had to do, which included not only living, but dedicating herself to helping others with RSD.
  • Terri found the value of heart in all you do, which became the basis for her work with her coaching, her subsequent books (she had already written several) and her popular podcast, Heartrepreneur Radio.
  • Interestingly, Terri’s journey is the reverse of what many of us have. She was living a life aligned with purpose and passion, and when the RSD hit, she had flipped into a life of obligation and disconnection with what she wanted. In that moment when she started writing a farewell note to her husband that became a book, the idea that really came out in the book is one of abundance. Valuing all that you have.
  • We are all just living our own experience, and need to respect that in each other. Ultimately, our actions only have to do with us, and the actions of others only have to do with them.

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023: The Path of Prosperity Has Nothing to Do with Money with Emmitt Muckles

By on September 18, 2018


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Emmitt Muckles is an Author, Podcaster and speaker/ corporate trainer. Emmitt’s mission is to share the knowledge of conscious unlimited living. His current project is the Billionaire Lifestyle Podcast interviewing conscious creators helping audiences self mind coach and feel connected.

Even though Emmitt was successful vocationally, with the creation of The Billionaire Lifestyle LLC, and The Billionaire Lifestyle Podcast/blog Emmitt was seeking what he calls an intended purposeful life, as part of the pact derived from his departed mother Juanita Terry-Muckles teachings and guidance. It was this driving endeavor that fueled the creative process that led to  “The Journey of One”.” To Emmitt it is all about servitude, giving what I was given.”

Emmitt has been writing privately for the last 20 years and has decided to begin sharing his talents with the world through speaking, podcasting and writing to inspire and motivate the potential in every living person.

Key Points from the Interview with Emmitt Muckles

  • We are all literally connected, not only through DNA, but trough air – we are all on the same planet, doing similar things and all that we do impacts everyone else. We have more in common than we think, even if we have different lives.
  • It’s up to me to do something. I can’t wait for someone else to do what I want done.
  • The Billionaire Lifestyle, Emmitt’s show and company, has nothing to do with money. Rather than being a financial billionaire, it’s about having that level of life wealth, if you will. It’s about richness in terms of experiences, values and a sense of yourself. He shared how, between your elbow and the tip of your finger, there are over a billion cells, so you are made up of billions – billions of lives (since each cell is alive).
  • Emmitt’s goal is to free 100 million people from this path of pursuing what they don’t really care about in a mindless way.
  • When you have an epiphany in your life and you’re in a relationship with someone who hasn’t had a similar shift, that can create a rift as it can lead two people who were on a similar path to be on divergent paths.
  • When you focus on what you really want in your life, it may not as you imagine it or how you want it, but it comes, and you need to be ready for and open to it.
  • Are you living a life on purpose or on accident. Are you living a life around accomplishing what you care about? Are you accumulating experiences in your life.
  • When Emmitt removed the things he didn’t care about in his life, he realized he was still paying for them (literally), which was even more of a sign that having them in his life was holding him back.
  • Every night before he falls asleep, Emmitt gives thanks for what he has in life. He pauses to appreciate what he has instead of focusing on what he doesn’t have. It’s about giving gratitude.
  • We talked about whether you need to go through the tough stuff to be able to learn how to avoid them and values what you should have, or can you just appreciate the good stuff without experiencing the bad stuff. Emmitt pointed out how many of us are already living with the things we don’t want or need, so the question may be irrelevant.
  • Are you carrying bonus baggage unnecessarily? Are you carrying things that aren’t yours? Do you have things weighing you down that are keeping you from living a free, abundant life?
  • Emmitt talked about a friend who came from a very strong community of family – something we have gotten away from. It’s about giving up self in support of the community, which many of us don’t naturally do.
  • Our spiritual and emotional progress does not equal or has not advanced as fast as our technological progress.
  • We cut ourselves off from all that the human dynamic has when we separate ourselves from each other.
  • The mind, the body and the spirit are all needed to achieve the billionaire lifestyle Emmitt talks about.
  • Emmitt reminds us not to worry about the path because it will be revealed to you as long as you continue in the direction of what you want.
  • When you plant a seed for something, don’t expect to get the fruit where you plant the seed. When you plant an apple seed in the ground, don’t look at the ground for the fruit because it will come from above you. So when you put work into something, the payback for that effort may come from a totally unexpected place.
  • There’s nothing new under the sun. Whatever you are looking for, someone has found it before, so look around, read, and you can find the path.
  • When we pray, that’s us talking our god. When we meditate, that’s our god’s chance to talk to us.
  • Have things that have value that you have given it rather than value that the world gives it. So many times, we are told to value things, but that doesn’t mean they have real value to us. We should question what value this inanimate thing gives to us.
  • Everything has its art. When you see someone who does something really well, they’re in their flow because they’re in the art of it. Other people see it as an action, and think they can do that thing, but they don’t necessarily come to understand the art.
  • Everything has a moment of action and a moment of rest. You’re never in one state perpetually.

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022: Why Having a Fit Mind Matters for Your Wellbeing with Lee Havern

By on September 10, 2018


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Lee HavernLee Havern had many years of mentoring clients successfully in the Health and Fitness Industry. Then the sudden loss of his father sparked a downward spiral into a depression that lasted over four years. One night, a scare behind the wheel when his car lost control snapped him out of the spiral just as he had hit rock bottom. That was the push he needed to see a better way to live.

He Co-Founded Platinum Training Institute, A Health and Fitness Education Provider in Queen’s University Belfast focused on helping those with real health battles like Cancer, cardiac problems and mental illness, find empowerment and support through their own fitness. He then decided to follow his passion helping others to discover Happiness through Mental Health and Well Being. This is where Fit Mind Matters was born.

Lee Havern shares his journey and his message, along with how he personally lives his life with balance and presence to stay out of the spiral and live the fullest, most satisfying life possible.

Key Points from the Episode with Lee Havern

  • Lee Havern is focused on helping people with health issues that are often overlooked by the fitness community with their physical conditioning as part of their journeys
  • This comes from Lee’s first hand experience struggling with depression and thoughts of ending it all in the wake of losing his father to Cancer
  • Decluttering and removing distractions from our lives is one of the main things Lee has personally focused on for himself to help free him to work on what actually matters to him
  • Through the process after his losing his father, Lee grew in many ways, some some specific changes
  • While he used to be a pleaser and a yes man, he learned that saying yes to everybody is actually saying yes to nobody
  • He became a father and got divorced.
  • He learned a lot about taking responsibility and apologizing to piece his life, his family and his friendships back together
  • Loss can force the forgiveness and healing we need.
  • Sometimes, it takes hitting rock bottom to realize you can’t go any lower. We may need to see the bad to appreciate the good.
  • Having a group that supports you while you go through that rebuilding journey can be crucial.
  • The focus on aesthetics wasn’t resonating with him in his work as a personal trainer and coach, which is what lead him to focusing on people with serious health (mental and physical) issues, which is why he founded Platinum Training Institute as a way to train others on how to train those most in need of physical fitness for the tough journeys they’re on.
  • Lee Havern shut off all of his social media to get even further away from the aesthetic focus on these platforms, and because of how they can pull your attention from what’s right in front of you, so of course he had to close all of his accounts given what he feels is most important in life.
  • Slow it down a bit. Switch everything off, take a deep breath, and close your eyes. That’s meditation at its essence, so allow yourself to do it by turning off the distractions.
  • Lee doesn’t even see a need for the health and fitness industry. If we all prioritized getting out and being in the world, there wouldn’t be a need for it.
  • The major issues people are dealing with that Platinum Training focuses on are all related to mental health. If someone has Cancer, cardiac issues, etc, of course they have mental health issues as a result. It all relates back to helping people with their mind and how they feel about themselves. So that’s what he focuses on in his practice.
  • When we go into a job to make money, that’s the wrong job.
  • Don’t let some outside statement define you or what you do. Learn yourself, do the testing on yourself and see what works for you.
  • Lee and I discussed weighing yourself, and the pros and cons of it. What he has learned is that if he feels overweight, there’s something going on mentally that the weight (or the feeling of being overweight) is a signal of. It’s a signal that, in some way, he’s not looking after himself the way he should.
  • Lee leaves us with three central things to focus on: health, happiness and simplicity.

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021: Redesigning Wellness by Knowing Yourself with Jen Arnold

By on September 4, 2018


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Jen ArnoldJen Arnold is host of the Redesigning Wellness podcast where she interviews experts on the topic of organizational health. Jen’s on a mission to change the common approach to employee health and wellness. To support this mission, she facilitates employee training that addresses leadership, resilience and mindfulness.

For the 16 years prior to starting her own business, Jen led organizational health and wellness efforts and advised employers how to start them. Most recently, she worked at Blue Cross Blue Shield of NC for over 8 years leading a team of health promotion professionals.

Jen Arnold is a TEDx speaker who uses stories, activities and humor to not only make a point but to keep audiences engaged and listening. She lives in Raleigh, NC with her husband, two children and dog.

Key Points from the Episode with Jen Arnold

  • Jen Arnold’s story in childhood following her parents’ divorce when she was six, and she grew up with a mother who battled binge eating habits. Sometimes that meant eating a lot of healthy things, having a lot of unhealthy things around, or sometimes having no food around because it was all eaten or because the means weren’t there for there to be enough food. This has lead to a sense of food scarcity, so even today she looks to savor and save her food because of the wiring that tells her that it could all be gone in the next moment.
  • She described her mother’s situation as “eating her pain,” which is a phrase that really struck home for me as someone who has battled with emotional eating in my past.
  • Jen grew up extremely aware of her body and what she ate, and found herself embarrassed by her weight and body composition since she had a more muscular build than other girls, so she naturally weighed more and was bigger, even though she wasn’t overweight for her structure. She shared a particular story from her childhood, growing up own the deep, hot South where she would wear jeans every day to hide her calves, which were bigger and more muscular than other girls’ because she didn’t want people to notice them.
  • Sometimes, we are the meanest to the people we are closest to, and we may not put the work and introspection in to have empathy and compassion for those closest to us. That includes not just our immediate family, but even ourselves. Instead of judging the person, recognize the ‘stuff’ behind the actions or behavior. That helps you realize that there is a reason for the behavior, it’s not often in the person’s conscious control or awareness, and it comes from hurt rather than intentional dysfunction.
  • Jen went through high school as a the achiever, good student, type A. And at 18, she was very directed, but under that outside facade, she didn’t really know what she really wanted in her life.
  • After a car accident at 19, Jen Arnold decided she needed a shift, so she changed colleges and her educational focus to nutrition and took a lot of psychology courses to add the understanding of people’s mindset. That’s how she started down the wellness path, landing a role in a corporate wellness position at a hospital to help employees deal with their weight.
  • While she tried to help as much as she could in her early roles, she found herself with ineffective tools from the standard toolkit around calorie restriction, increased movement and short-term goals around things like corporate weight loss challenges.
  • She started her show, Redesigning Wellness, and started to find out more about mindfulness and its connection to effectively eating better through a guest she interviewed. While that was empowering to discover, it also showed her plainly that she was doing it wrong so far, which was a hard thing to deal with, bringing guilt and a sense of perhaps failing people.
  • She dove further into mindful eating education herself, and started to use that theme in her discussions with corporate clients and individuals she was trying to help.
  • The focus needs to shift from being about the weight and being about the person. It’s less about the surface level things, and more about the underlying reasons and values.
  • We focus on weight so often, and weight isn’t the question. We judge people who lost weight as doing something positive and looking good, but miss why they lost weight and whether they should. Jen shared the story from when she was in a pattern of getting sick over and over and a nurse at the doctor’s office was all excited and celebrating that she had lost weight without realizing it was because she was unwell.
  • We talked about exercise as a penance for what you eat. It’s a punishment, or a must-do. It’s to undo the choices you made around what you ate or will eat. That just reinforces the emotional connection to food, and strengthens the wrong kinds of thoughts around food. Jen talked about joyful movement instead. Let it feel good to move your body in and of itself, without connecting it to undoing some other ‘bad’ in your life.
  • Mindfulness, in essence, is the power of the pause. Stopping and checking in with yourself to break the cycle of mindless actions.

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